Dating ashley

Ashley Madison, which goaded more prudish corners of the internet with the tagline "Life is short.

Have an affair," was hacked in July 2015 by a group calling itself The Impact Team.

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According to the FTC complaint, until August 2014, operators of the site lured customers, including 19 million Americans, with fake profiles of women designed to convert them into paid members.

The company failed to adequately protect users' personal information such as date of birth, relationship status and sexual preferences.

Now, the Canadian company behind Ashley Madison, Avid Life Media (ALM), has been the subject of a scathing report from the Privacy Commissioner of Canada and the Australian Privacy Commissioner, criticising ALM's actions following the massive data breach.

(In July this year, ALM rebranded as Ruby, though the report refers to the company by its previous name).

The hackers warned ALM that it would leak personal details of 36 million members unless ALM changed its policies -- specifically around letting users permanently delete their accounts.

ALM declined, the hackers leaked the data and scandal ensued as users panicked about their private lives and the internet raked through the dirty laundry.

Have a dedicated risk management process in place to protect personal information."That's not a sexy tagline for a dating website that encouraged members to conduct extra-marital affairs.

But it's one that Ashley Madison might be wishing it adopted after it was hacked last year.

Turns out that Ashley Madison users weren’t the only ones cheating: The dating website was tricking its male users into believing that robots were seductive females. Have an affair” enticed millions of male users, but females were scarce on the platform. Fembots—computer-generated fake female profiles—would chat up non-paying male users.

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