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Matalin wants to know why Williams calls himself “Meteor Man,” a nickname he borrowed from the 1993 movie about a black superhero. “I guess it's because I go around the world spreading values,” he says, with about as much modesty as you'd expect from someone comparing himself to a superhero. Matalin steers the conversation to some of Williams' pet topics, allowing Meteor Man to spread a few values on 's viewers.

He delivers a brief colloquy on black Republicans: African-Americans actually hold more conservative views than other Americans, Williams opines, but power-hungry black leaders have duped them, persuading them to swap their votes for Democratic handouts. He mourns America's obsession with race, and insists that Americans must view each other as people, not skin colors.

“Those are the only voices you hear, and they have been the only voices for so long that people believe that..is the way all black Americans think.” “But now we have the radio, the TV, the books, the newsletter, the columns. Whenever a fan waylays him on the street, he replies with a cheerful, “Stay on the Right Side.” “I am not out to promote any agenda except that which I think is morally right,” he says.

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This is one of his verbal tics, a clever way of adding a patina of authority to his position. “He is smart and he is courageous, and the seat of his courage is that he is a morally grounded person and he understands truth,” says Keith Clinkscales, president and CEO of magazine.

“He has a strong vision of what he believes is right, and he stands up for it.” “Rightness” is not a complicated philosophical concept for Williams.

So Williams has appointed himself to speak for them.

“The Democratic party has done a wonderful job of taking people like Jesse Jackson and giving them a microphone and getting them on the editorial pages of newspapers and getting them TV shows,” he says.

Switch on C-SPAN: Williams is dazzling the crowd at a GOP conference. In early January, he inaugurated his own weekly, hour-long program on National Empowerment Television (NET), the conservative cable network. Cannell is gambling that millions of Americans will tune in to Williams' telemorality plays and tune out David Letterman and Jay Leno. Williams is wooing the ivory-tower crowd as well as the TV nation. And he serves as CEO of the Graham Williams Group, an eight-employee, Washington, D. Armstrong Williams claims to represent a silent majority—or at least plurality—of black America.

Change channels to : Williams is fulminating against O. According to Williams, “so-called black leaders”—his derisive term for the Congressional Black Caucus, the NAACP, and Jesse Jackson—have betrayed or ignored millions of traditional, churchgoing African-American families.Late in the half-hour program, Williams is asked about his favorite value of all: personal responsibility. “ get out of bed in the morning and work from a.m. “That was the best answer I have ever heard,” Howar gushes. It is a symbolic moment: The high priestess of Republican spin bestows her blessing on one of the practice's rising stars.“You should get a tape of this show, pull out that answer, and play it wherever you go.” Matalin leaps to join Howar on the Williams bandwagon. Williams settles into the cab that will ferry him back to his Dupont Circle office and breaks into cheerful laughter. From compulsive gamblers to shopaholics to drug addicts, Intervention profiles people whose dependencies or compulsive behaviors have brought them to a point of personal crisis and estranged them from their friends and loved ones.and former political strategist for President George Bush, introduces the black conservative talk-radio host, budding television star, public-relations executive, and syndicated columnist as a “mega-multimedia rapidly lapses into a syrupy, right-wing lovefest.It was his first appearance on .” These days, almost everyone is fawning over the Meteor Man. Newt Gingrich is massacring Democratic giraffes on Capitol Hill.

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